10 Places in Japan That Look Like They’ve Been Taken Out Of Fairy Tales

Today fellow lazy penguins, we will travel away to the Pacific Ocean, reaching an exotic country you may know from their food, animation movies, gardens and cherry blossoms.

In the Land of the Rising Sun, you can be captivated by the great architectural legacy of the feudal era, the impressive Mount Fuji or the fragility and delicacy of their gardens. Japan (in japanese: 日本 Nippon or Nihon) is a country also deeply rooted to their traditions and religious beliefs with a vast heritage of beautiful Buddhist and Shinto temples.

Same as before, we put together ten places which that they have been taken out of fairy tales – enjoy, and do not forget to let us know what you think.

10. Sagano Bamboo Forest, Kyoto.

Sagano Bamboo Forest, Kyoto

Sagano Bamboo Forest, Kyoto

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Arashiyama is a beautiful tourist destination west of the city of Kyoto, especially known for its bamboo forest, although it offers many more options for tourism, leisure and entertainment. And for us to enjoy this area of ​​the old Japanese capital to the fullest, we compile in this post some of the best things to see and do. Visit Tenryuji Temple, one of the five largest Zen temples in Kyoto and, without a doubt, the most impressive temple in Arashiyama. Take a leisurely stroll through the famous bamboo forest of Arashiyama, one of the key points of the visit to this area of ​​the city. Quietly, of course, it will depend on the type of photos we want to take, because it is normal for it to be very crowded. From here we are very close to the small Nanomiya shrine, related to the Great Shrine of Ise and which houses some of the most important festivals in the city (you can see it below). Forget the world walking through the Kameyama park, a respite from peace and tranquility in the tourist bustle that can sometimes be Arashiyama. Enter the former residence of actor Okochi Denjiro. The entrance costs about 1,000 yen, but includes matcha tea and a Japanese sweet. Alternatively, we can enter the Rakushisha residence, a small cabin of the 16th-century haiku poet Mukai Kyorai (disciple of the famous Basho). Visit the nearby Seiryo-ji temple, where we can find many works of art and national treasures, such as a Buddha statue from 1,000 years ago. Admire the moss and maples garden of the Goiji temple, especially in autumn, although it is beautiful year-round.

9. Aogashima Island.

Aogashima Island

Aogashima Island

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Japan is an inexhaustible source of social and geographical curiosities. In the case of Aogashima, both sides are united. In the Philippine Sea, that is, just to the south vertical of the city of Tokyo, there is a volcanic island that is the southernmost and most isolated of the Izu archipelago. This is a story of volcanoes. Barely 3.5 kilometers long at its widest part, Aogashima has a Quaternary origin and its morphology responds to the superimposed remains of at least four underwater calderas. The most striking thing about the island is that the devastating effect of its last eruption, back in 1785 and which lasted almost a month, killed approximately half of its population, between 130 and 140 inhabitants of the 327 residents of the epoch. The survivors fled to Hachijojima and it was not until fifty years later that the island again received new tenants. Today it is still inhabited and it is a not inconsiderable tourist destination despite its difficult access, either by boat or by helicopter (one leaves daily if the weather permits).

8. Gifu, Shirakawa-go.

Gifu, Shirakawa-go

Gifu, Shirakawa-go

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Shirakawa-go, formally called Shirakawa-mura, is a historic village belonging to the Gifu Prefecture. Shirakawa-go and the neighboring region of Gokayama lie along the Shogawa River and are surrounded by the mountains that separate the Gifu and Toyama prefectures. This village, next to Gokayama in Toyama, was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995. Ogimachi, the largest village in Shirakawa-go and main tourist attraction, the vast majority of its houses are now museums, restaurants or minshukus, so if you have time, we recommend staying one night in one of its houses to have a complete experience.

7. Wisteria Tunnel, Kawachi Fuji Garden in Kitakyushu.

Wisteria Tunnel, Kawachi Fuji Garden in Kitakyushu

Wisteria Tunnel, Kawachi Fuji Garden in Kitakyushu

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Kawachi Fuji Gardens, one of the most photographed. Its ceiling of purple, pink and white flowers creates an atmosphere of dreamy and romance. Japanese are very adept at flower care, so a place like the Kawachi Fuji Botanical Garden in Kitakyushu is no surprise. The Wisteria Tunnel is the main attraction, with about 1,000 square meters of exquisite scenery. You will be able to enjoy more than 150 floral species that will delight your pupils and you will want to fill your memory with photographs of the Wisteria Tunnel in Japan. The best season to visit it is in April and May, when spring gives the species their maximum splendor to be able to fall in love with its colors and aromas.

6. Hirosaki Castle.

Hirosaki Castle

Hirosaki Castle

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Located within Hirosaki Park, one of the best places to see the cherry blossoms in Japan, Hirosaki Castle was built by the Tsugaru Clan in 1611. The original castle burned down after a lightning strike in 1627 and was rebuilt in 1810. The three-story castle tower, the fortified moats and the castle gates are part of the original challenges that still remain.

5. Teahouse Tetsu, Yamanashi.

Teahouse Tetsu, Yamanashi

Teahouse Tetsu, Yamanashi

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This magical tea house that is built on a tree is part of one of the most unusual exhibits at the Kiyoharu Shirakaha museum, and is located in the garden of the museum. Inside the cabin you can taste the best types of tea and adore the wonderful panorama that surrounds it.

4. Himeji Castle, Himeji.

Himeji Castle

Himeji Castle

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It is the most visited castle in Japan and one of the most impressive in the world. In the coastal city of Himeji, it is one of the oldest surviving architectural structures from medieval Japan.

3. Gardens of Saijo-Ji, Kyoto.

Gardens of Kyoto

Gardens of Kyoto

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Saiho-ji Temple, also known as Koke-dera, or Moss Temple is famous for its moss-covered garden, one of the most famous gardens in all of Japan. The gardens here have been designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty in Japan and are arranged as a circular walk centered on Golden Pond. The garden also contains three teahouses where you can relax and reflect on the world. The lush green garden at Saiho-ji temple takes you to another world with its beauty and tranquility. Just remember to make a reservation in advance as entrance to the temple and garden requires a reservation.

2. Matsumoto Castle.

Matsumoto Castle

Matsumoto Castle

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Matsumoto Castle is one of the twelve castles of original construction that we can find in Japan. The castle commonly receives the nickname of the “black crow”, by the black color of its walls, in contrast to the “white heron”, nickname that receives the castle of Himeji.

1. Gifu, Honshu Island.

Gifu, Honshu Island

Gifu, Honshu Island

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The main island in Japan is Honshu Island (227,962 square kilometers), which is the seventh largest island in the world. Some of the largest cities in the country are located on this island. Including the capital Tokyo, one of the most populated metropolises in the world.

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